An evergreen tree on your property looks beautiful when the tree is green but if it is looking a little brown, it can be an eyesore. As a property owner, you are likely disappointed to see your evergreen turning brown, and this could be a sign that your evergreen is dying from bottom up. Your tree’s condition may be from a number of reasons, and once you know what’s affecting your evergreen, you can treat it.

Pests or Disease Are Killing Your Tree

Look at your tree. What do you notice? There are diseases and pests that may give your evergreen certain appearance changes. For instance, if you see that holes or sawdust appear on the branches of your tree, this is likely from a pest, such as the pine beetle. A disease like cytospora canker disease will make changes to the tree, leaving cankers, killing needles, and leaking white sap. Examine your tree for any of these noticeable changes.

Your Evergreen is Dying from Bottom Up Due to Lack of Water

Trees naturally need water, and your evergreen may have brown needles due to lack of water. While your evergreen receives its water from the earth, if the tree does not get enough hydration for all of its needles, the lower needles will turn brown and die; this happens so the rest of the needles can survive. Has your area received only small amounts of rain? If so, your evergreen may need additional water. Touch the soil around the tree, and if it is it dry, be sure you give your tree extra water. Using mulch is also a way to retain moisture in the soil.

Your Evergreen is Healthy, Just Shedding Old Needles

It may look like your evergreen is dying from bottom-up, especially if it has brown needles, but it may just be a natural occurrence. If the water is sufficient for your evergreen, and you’ve ruled out a tree disease, it could just be the tree’s life cycle. An evergreen will periodically shed older needles as time goes on; this is natural. If your tree has grown significantly over the last year, the higher needles may block out sunlight from the needles located lower on the tree — this can result in the lower needles dying off. The best tactic is to remain vigilant on your tree’s water and health condition and consult an arborist if you need additional help.

Fall is approaching quickly, and with it comes a myriad of common pests. These insects want nothing more than to make a meal out of your favorite reading tree! In order to stop them, you’ll need information. What are the symptoms you’re seeing in your trees? How can the pests be stopped? With your arbologist’s help and knowledge of what to look for, pest infestations can be easily managed.

SYMPTOMS

In order to properly combat the pests currently making a nuisance in your trees, you must first understand that there are several common insects that could be behind this. If you’re seeing what appears to be spider webs or bags of silk, you’re dealing with one of two particular pests. If leaves are browning and becoming brittle to the touch, and you find yourself itching after reading a good book under your favorite oak tree, you’ve found yourself dealing with oak mites. Leaves can also have small yellowish bumps on them, and younger, smaller trees can lose their leaves completely- a clear sign that you’re dealing with oak worm moths. If twigs and branches are dying, however, the magnolia scale is to blame. And finally, if you’re seeing needle loss in your conifers, the spruce spider mite may be to blame.

Now that you understand some of the symptoms, it’s time to arm yourself with treatment. There are several different ways to tackle this problem and save your trees, and each pest requires a different strategy.

FALL WEBWORM

The fall webworm sounds innocuous enough, and you may mistake it for a particularly prolific web-spinner when you first spot the symptoms of infestation. The fall webworm spins a hefty netting of webs on the ends of tree branches and then feed on the leaves within the safety of the net. The webs are usually accompanied by some leaf loss in the late summer and fall, a sure sign that the webworms are hungry. The usual victims of webworm infestation are black walnut, mulberry, wild cherry, pecan, persimmon, and sweetgum trees. In order to get rid of them, you need to physically remove each web you come across in the fall, then follow up with a round of insecticide in the spring.

BURROWED BAGWORM

The burrowed bagworm spins webs as well, though theirs look silkier. Like their webworm cousins, the bagworm uses the webs- which look like bags of silk and debris- as protection while eating leaves and needles. Their most common victims include juniper, willow, elm, cedar, spruce, maple, birch, and poplar trees. Arborvitae, linden, and honeylocust trees can become victims as well. In order to control and get rid of a burrowed bagworm infestation, you must remove and destroy every ‘bag’ they spin. Consult your arbologist if the task is too much to handle, they might have a better solution.

BITING OAK MITE

Suppose you’ve just finished reading a book under your favorite oak tree. A couple of days pass and your skin starts to itch and you notice that your favorite oak tree’s leaves are brown and brittle to the touch. The biting oak mite feeds on the larvae of other tree pests and is most common in Ohio and the Midwestern part of the country. Like the name implies, all species of oak tree are its favorite victims. To control an oak mite infestation, consult your local arbologist for treatment recommendations, and make sure you thoroughly wash yourself off after sitting under that oak tree, just in case an oak mite decided you looked tasty!

SPRUCE SPIDER MITE

If your conifers are suddenly losing their needles, or you’ve discovered yellow spots on them, the spruce spider mite may be the likely culprit. They feed on tree sap, and like the webworm and bagworm, they spin small webs to protect themselves. The most commonly infect fir, hemlock, juniper, spruce, and arborvitae. In order to best control them, use a low-viscosity horticultural oil. Check with your arbologist for recommendations and make sure you perform the treatment during the fall so that you’ll be rid of mites when winter comes.

 

MAGNOLIA SCALE

As its name implies, the magnolia scale is fond of magnolia trees, infesting them exclusively. They leave behind a sticky substance called honeydew on leaves and branches, and an infestation usually results in flower loss and twig or branch death. To control this pest, speak to your local arbologist for treatment recommendations, and make sure you apply that treatment before winter comes!

OAKWORM MOTH

Ever wonder what those yellow bumps on leaves are? They’re oak worm moth eggs and sure signs of infestation. They love to eat all kinds of oak leaves- hence the name, though they will also attack maple, birch, and hazel trees as well. Prune off the eggs in order to treat the infestation, though if your trees have begun losing leaves, it’s time to call for your arbologist to treat the infected tree with insecticide. The best time to prevent an outbreak is during early fall.

Remember, if you see signs of pest infestation, you can call your local arbologist to come to inspect the infected trees and recommend the best possible treatment!

What A Knoxville Tree Surgeon Does.

If you’ve ever considered becoming a Knoxville Tree Surgeon, it’s recommended that find out exactly what the job entails so that you can do it to the best of your abilities. This article will tell you in a degree of detail what a tree surgeon does.

Getting Job Qualifications

Knoxville Tree SurgeryTo become a Knoxville Tree Surgeon you initially need to get a job, and to get that job there are certain things you need to do. Initially, you need to get qualified, and that can involve attaining Levels 1-3 in either NPTC or SSTS. Of course, to get your foot in the door, so to speak, you only need a Level 1 qualification, however as your career progresses you may well come to realise that there’s much more you want and so if owning your company is your aim, for example, then you’ll need a Level 3.

Once you have your qualifications, you can go about getting a job. There are many different avenues as to how best get a job – you could go through a recruitment consultant as you might in other careers, or you may have been a volunteer at a company while you qualified and be looking to extend your relationship with them. It is up to you how you pursue your ambition.

Requirements of Doing The Job

Once you have qualified and found someone willing to take you on there are many things that a junior tree surgeon is expected to do. Obviously, you’ll need a good head for heights, because tree surgeons spend a lot of their time up trees, carrying out tasks such as searching for branches that are likely to become detached and fall in heavy snow or high winds. If you can spot dead wood, split and cracked limbs then you’ll do well in your first jobs.

In the winter you’ll spend a lot of your time milling the timber as well as identifying and removing trees that have been lost during the summer. In the summer months, however, you’ll be concentrating more on thinning the trees so that they don’t become overgrown while also strengthening the trees with cables and bolts.

As you can see there is a lot to being a Knoxville Tree Surgeon, and while it can be an incredibly rewarding job if you’re not the right sort of person for it you’ll find it an onerous one, and it’s unlikely to make you happy. Of course, if you’re the right match for it then it could be brilliant for you. Apply Today!

You don’t need to be a professional to tell whether you’ve got a dead, sick or healthy tree. Dead trees need tree service to remove them, but a sick tree can be nursed back to health on your own. If you are in need of the guidelines for determining what you’ve got, look no further.

Your Tree’s Leaves and Branches

Sick trees will shed their trees earlier than is appropriate, or at a much faster rate than usual. Other times your leaves may not fall, but can look sick. Sick leaves look unusual, curled up or discolored. It’s also not uncommon for sick trees to shed leaves and have branched fall completely off. If there is no other explanation for branches falling, such as strong winds or a recent storm, you may have a sick tree. Check your tree’s other vitals to further indicate whether your tree is well or not.

Your Tree’s Trunk

One of the more noticeable signs of a sick tree is a dented, has holes or looks like it’s deteriorating or rotting in anyway. A healthy tree’s bark will be soft and bend a little and a sick or dying tree will have brittle bark that breaks easily or falls off. This, balding, is a sign of a dying tree and should be addressed immediately.

Your Tree’s Roots

Your tree’s roots are extremely important and often left exposed and vulnerable. If a child’s toy or a lawn mower damages the roots in any way, the whole tree maybe in danger. The same is true if there is flooding around the tree’s roots.

New Growth or Insect Infestation

Harmful insect species are a potential threat to trees and many have usual suspects they fight off each year. A vulnerable tree may not have the strength if one or more other symptoms are present. If new mushroom types or caterpillar like bugs are present in conjunction to other symptoms, you might want a second opinion from a professional.

What To Do

A sick tree can be diagnosed and treated by a professional arborist. An arborist is different than a tree serviceman. An arborist is a tree doctor. If you have every reason to believe the tree is dead or beyond help, it’s best to call a tree service to safely remove it from the property without damaging the surrounding earth, plant life and people.

 

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