Have you ever looked back upon the old phrase that in no way can lighting strike the same spot twice? If this were the case, then without a doubt, it would be liberation for our trees in the center of the summer storms. Nonetheless, contrary to what we have had, lighting strikes can occur more frequently than we contemplate and the trees are the principal target.

To that end, this article will show you how to determine if lighting hit a tree. Even more, you will learn the steps you can take to guard the trees against impending lightning damage.

What comes about when lightning has stricken a tree?

Typically, lightning aims at the layer of soal and water that is exactly beneath the back of a tree. As such, this sweet spot is regarded as the ideal line of passage for the bolt of lightning.

As lightning travels through this layer of the tree, chunks of bark blow out from the trunk. Furthermore, the water supply of the leaves is cut off, and as a result, they are left wilted and unable to generate food for the tree.

Can a tree pull through after a strike by lightning?

The capacity for recovery by a tree after a lightning strike depends on various factors such as the level of power of lightning, moisture, health, as well as the species of the tree.

On this note, after a storm passes, first examine if the tree poses a danger to your home or the passersby. As such, you should remove hanging or jagged branches, which are small in size when you spot them.

Furthermore, you should contact your local arborist if the tree needs large limbs removed or if it looks dangerous. In a similar fashion, the arborist can as well carry out an in-depth assessment of the risk posed by the tree, and they can share with you, their expert opinion.

In some instances, the wounds induced by the lightning will restore to health by themselves over time. However, more extreme wounds in the trunk will leave the tree susceptible to the entrance of disease and insect or harsh weather, which can lead to the decline of trees.

How can you protect a tree from lightning?

The proactive method of keeping your property as well as your tree safe is installing a lightning protection system. Here, you will need to set up the system on the trunk of the tree and run it into the soil. A thick copper cable system will present the lightning with a substitute passageway to the ground.

A tree can be a majestic sight, it can inspire us. Words like imposing, magnificent and marvelous usually come to mind.

Sometimes, though, massive spider webs embedded in the trees toss these words out and get replaced by something like eerie and terrifying.

Now, you might be asking to yourself: just what kind of spiders builds webs in trees. Interestingly enough, is not spiders at all. But rather; another type of tree pest, called fall webworms. But, what are they? Why do they build webs? Learn this and how to get rid of those pesky nests on your tree.

Why my trees, what is it about them?

Now you know that it is not actual spiders, but fall webworms, known as aesthetic pests.

These so-call worms are caterpillars that feed on trees and, while doing so, weave a thick web. They feed on over 100 different types of trees but fruity ones are their favorites.

How long will they stick around?

Fall webworms earn their name for a reason. Their webs are commonly spotted around the fall season.

However they are present year-round, laying eggs in winter that will hatch in spring. Then summer time means lunch as they feed off your tree leaves; starting the webbing process come fall.

So, how much of a big deal are they? Are my trees doomed?

Not at all; like we mentioned before, fall webworms are an aesthetic pest. While the latter word sounds pessimistic. They are not poisonous and won’t damage aged trees.

However, it can be a different story for very young trees. Fall webworms feed on leaves and excessive feeding can cause total leaf loss before trees complete their development. You need to be on the lookout and protect your younger trees, so they may thrive.

Ok, so how do I get rid of these “spider webs”?

A good stroke with a broom or similar object is always a great start, use it to remove webs from branches and make your trees look great again.

Keep in mind that the winter season means fall webworms are holed up in their cocoons rather than their webs. If you’re not throughout enough, they will return when summer arrives.

A more permanent solution is to cut off branches that are webbed. Or spray the leaves, not the webs themselves, with insecticide.

Fall is approaching quickly, and with it comes a myriad of common pests. These insects want nothing more than to make a meal out of your favorite reading tree! In order to stop them, you’ll need information. What are the symptoms you’re seeing in your trees? How can the pests be stopped? With your arbologist’s help and knowledge of what to look for, pest infestations can be easily managed.

SYMPTOMS

In order to properly combat the pests currently making a nuisance in your trees, you must first understand that there are several common insects that could be behind this. If you’re seeing what appears to be spider webs or bags of silk, you’re dealing with one of two particular pests. If leaves are browning and becoming brittle to the touch, and you find yourself itching after reading a good book under your favorite oak tree, you’ve found yourself dealing with oak mites. Leaves can also have small yellowish bumps on them, and younger, smaller trees can lose their leaves completely- a clear sign that you’re dealing with oak worm moths. If twigs and branches are dying, however, the magnolia scale is to blame. And finally, if you’re seeing needle loss in your conifers, the spruce spider mite may be to blame.

Now that you understand some of the symptoms, it’s time to arm yourself with treatment. There are several different ways to tackle this problem and save your trees, and each pest requires a different strategy.

FALL WEBWORM

The fall webworm sounds innocuous enough, and you may mistake it for a particularly prolific web-spinner when you first spot the symptoms of infestation. The fall webworm spins a hefty netting of webs on the ends of tree branches and then feed on the leaves within the safety of the net. The webs are usually accompanied by some leaf loss in the late summer and fall, a sure sign that the webworms are hungry. The usual victims of webworm infestation are black walnut, mulberry, wild cherry, pecan, persimmon, and sweetgum trees. In order to get rid of them, you need to physically remove each web you come across in the fall, then follow up with a round of insecticide in the spring.

BURROWED BAGWORM

The burrowed bagworm spins webs as well, though theirs look silkier. Like their webworm cousins, the bagworm uses the webs- which look like bags of silk and debris- as protection while eating leaves and needles. Their most common victims include juniper, willow, elm, cedar, spruce, maple, birch, and poplar trees. Arborvitae, linden, and honeylocust trees can become victims as well. In order to control and get rid of a burrowed bagworm infestation, you must remove and destroy every ‘bag’ they spin. Consult your arbologist if the task is too much to handle, they might have a better solution.

BITING OAK MITE

Suppose you’ve just finished reading a book under your favorite oak tree. A couple of days pass and your skin starts to itch and you notice that your favorite oak tree’s leaves are brown and brittle to the touch. The biting oak mite feeds on the larvae of other tree pests and is most common in Ohio and the Midwestern part of the country. Like the name implies, all species of oak tree are its favorite victims. To control an oak mite infestation, consult your local arbologist for treatment recommendations, and make sure you thoroughly wash yourself off after sitting under that oak tree, just in case an oak mite decided you looked tasty!

SPRUCE SPIDER MITE

If your conifers are suddenly losing their needles, or you’ve discovered yellow spots on them, the spruce spider mite may be the likely culprit. They feed on tree sap, and like the webworm and bagworm, they spin small webs to protect themselves. The most commonly infect fir, hemlock, juniper, spruce, and arborvitae. In order to best control them, use a low-viscosity horticultural oil. Check with your arbologist for recommendations and make sure you perform the treatment during the fall so that you’ll be rid of mites when winter comes.

 

MAGNOLIA SCALE

As its name implies, the magnolia scale is fond of magnolia trees, infesting them exclusively. They leave behind a sticky substance called honeydew on leaves and branches, and an infestation usually results in flower loss and twig or branch death. To control this pest, speak to your local arbologist for treatment recommendations, and make sure you apply that treatment before winter comes!

OAKWORM MOTH

Ever wonder what those yellow bumps on leaves are? They’re oak worm moth eggs and sure signs of infestation. They love to eat all kinds of oak leaves- hence the name, though they will also attack maple, birch, and hazel trees as well. Prune off the eggs in order to treat the infestation, though if your trees have begun losing leaves, it’s time to call for your arbologist to treat the infected tree with insecticide. The best time to prevent an outbreak is during early fall.

Remember, if you see signs of pest infestation, you can call your local arbologist to come to inspect the infected trees and recommend the best possible treatment!

Winter Tree Service in Knoxville Tennessee-2-2The frightful conditions experienced during winter could be very delightful for your trees. However, a winter season has the potential of destroying your trees because trees are usually susceptible to injuries during such cold moments. The following list is made up of the 5 biggest threats that might harm your trees during this winter period. The tips also give a brief explanation on how to ensure that your trees thrive for the oncoming spring.

Threat #5 -Winter Drought

Quench The Thirst of your trees so as to prevent winter drought

Young trees are usually very thirsty because they are still growing. Water plays a very significant role during this growth stage of trees. It is therefore advisable that you water your young trees regularly until the tree is mature. During winter, precipitation levels are low and consequently, trees might be thirsty’. It is therefore recommended that you water your trees thoroughly just before winter sets in so as to ensure continuous growth. Doing this will ensure that your trees remain healthy.

Threat #4 -Cold Roots

Mulch the tree so as to avoid cold roots

Mulching refers to a process mostly used in agriculture so as to help plants reduce loss of moisture. During winter, all parts of the tree might go dormant because of the cold, yet the roots remain the first victims of this harsh cold. The location of roots make them more susceptible to freezing and frosting.

To help protect your trees, it is important that you insulate them. The best insulation would be through the use of composted mulch that will act like a scarf of between the roots and the harsh external environmental conditions. Mulching will keep your tree warm and insulated, and it will also help in moisture regulation. For the best results, apply three inches of mulch within a radius of three feet around the tree leaving a three inch gap near the stump.

Threat #3 -Heavy Snowfall

Have a snow pickup to combat heavy snowfall

During winter, snow is fun to play with, for instance for sledding, snowball fighting or building snowmen. However, this snow always impacts badly on your trees. Depending with the type of your trees, brushing off snow from the tree will go a long way in protecting the tree. Trees prone to damage during winter are those that have narrow upright branches with multiple stems. This is because heavy accumulations could tear the trees apart. It is therefore advisable that you clean up your tree after a snowfall so that snow does not accumulate. You should be gentle on the branches so that you do not cause breakages. We highly recommend the removal of snow accumulation using a soft broom or your hand and sweeping towards the trunk. Sweeping downwards towards the stump might break the branches or stems. Shaking branches to shed off the snow should also be done gently so as to avoid breakage.

Threat #4 – Falling Limbs

Brace yourself for falling limbs

Is your parking yard or house near trees? Trees often look beautiful during spring and summer but can be disastrous during winter. This is because the cold conditions result in stress on the trees hence resulting in breakage. Falling limbs could fall on your car or on the roof of your house. If there are tree branches and limbs that hang above your car or house or any other prized possessions, it is advisable that you brace or cable them just before winter. However, if you realize that the branches are dead, it is advisable that you cut them down altogether.

Threat #5 -Salty Sidewalks

Find a new solution to salty sidewalks

In the northern regions, most people use salt to de-ice driveways and walkways during winter. This, however, usually has a negative effect on the health of your trees. This salt is usually absorbed by the roots of the trees hence ruining their health which in turn results in browning of the leaves during summer and spring.

In order to avoid this problem, it is important that you use de-icing alternatives that are environmentally friendly. Such alternatives include calcium chloride and TruGreen’s Ice Melt, magnesium chloride and potassium chloride. Alternatively, you could construct a simple snow fence so as to defend the tree. As simple as it may sound, this simply refers to a barrier made from any fencing material or chicken wire mesh round the tree such that snow does not fall on the area around the stump of the tree. Professionals also encourage people to flush the tree pit using a lot of water during spring.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Does Your Insurance Cover Tree Removal After Storms?

There can be a plethora of useful benefits of planting trees, starting from environmental impact to your health, to economics & even psychological effects too. Plus, planting and maintaining trees also helps to reduce pollution while improving your surroundings with soothing green ambiance and increasing the overall value of your property.

tree-removal-insurance-knoxville-tennesseeObviously, you should always aim to protect the trees. However, if a big tree gets rooted out after a severe storm, it can actually cause serious damage to your property.

Hence, in order to keep your house, trees, and wallet safe, you must seek an answer for these two utterly important questions right before another devastating storm. Are the trees (surrounded in your housing compound) healthy enough to withstand an insanely severe storm? If, by any chance, the trees get uprooted, does your insurance cover all the expenses related to tree loss and tree removal?

Does Homeowners Insurance Cover Tree Removal After Storms? : In general, such insurance policies and their terms & conditions greatly vary. Some insurance policies may keep you covered from severe storms that take down trees. But, often, several policies may not allow you to cover expenses if a tree falls but it doesn’t damage your home or the building structures, such as a garage and fence.

In order to avoid any disputes or other associated problems with your insurance company, you should ideally contact an arborist as soon as possible. Knoxville Tree Service has a team of experienced arborists who’re well expertized in this very field. You can easily schedule an appointment with them who will further guide or recommend you about removing any particular tree.

How Much Tree Damage Insurance Claims Can Cost? : While, the tornados & winter storm damage are the major causes of filing a tree damage insurance claim. Based on a recent study, tornados can cause severe damage to both autos and homes. And the average auto claim for tornado damage is around $4,000 while the average home claim is about $24,000.

According to a research published by Insurance Information Institute, winter wind claims can be around $7,000 while an average ice or snow claims can be an approximate amount of $4,757.

Will You Have to Actually Pay for Such Claims? Will Your Insurance Rate Increase? : According to a Nationwide study, 2 out of 3 house owners are actually underinsured who often end up paying additional costs.

Plus, when you have already filed a single claim, your general insurance rates can increase at least by 9 percent (on average).

How Can You Avoid Such Claims? : An ideal way to avoid the costly tree damage insurance claims – is to be more proactive enough about your tree care and also schedule regular tree inspections.

In this context, Knoxville Tree Service offers you the best quality tree service with a passion for taking minute yet meticulous care of your trees. If you take help from their professional and knowledgeable tree service experts, you’ll be well aware of these inevitable risks much ahead of time. Thus, you will also have a greater chance of preventing an unwanted damage.

Hence, a tree service from Knoxville Tree Service will give you a blissful peace of mind both by keeping your home safe as well as ensuring a better tree health.

Several types of trees usually shed their leaves as a key strategy to survive adverse weather conditions. In temperate forests across Northern Hemisphere, trees also lose their leaves during autumn as the cold weather approaches.

what-causes-leaves-to-change-color-knoxville-tree-serviceTrees lose their leaves at the beginning of the dry season in tropical and subtropical forests. Trees which shed all of their leaves for part of the year are referred to as deciduous trees while those which do not are referred to as evergreen trees.

Every autumn, we expect to see tree leaves change color. But how do they know when it is time to change? Leaves can actually sense less daylight and cool temperatures that cause them to change color and finally drop–often around October.

If trees shed leaves well before the fall season, then something might be wrong with the health of your tree. One of our readers in Texas did notice that right before fall, his oak tree started to lose its leaves way early. Now, it has lost nearly all its leaves.

Learn why the leaves of your tree may fall early. Here are four reasons why trees shed their leaves in August or early fall.

1. Pests and diseases

Leaf diseases or summer pests usually make their mark by changing the color of leaves (often, yellow) and causing them to droop or wilt. Ultimately, the infected leaves fall earlier than normal. If you live in Knoxville, TN or the surrounding areas, consult Knoxville Tree Service to know summer pests could be hurting your trees.

Also, pests such as mites, scales, and whiteflies can cause early defoliation. Spraying a pesticide will eradicate the infestation, but may not be practical for huge trees.

2. A crowded canopy

During a growing season, some trees may have grown extra leaves than they can support. Early leaf drop is an important mechanism for trees to conserve water in hot and dry weather. As long as the leaf loss is not severe, all your tree requires to recover is its weekly irrigation.

3. Old leaves

The leaves of a tree are temporary, even on the evergreens. They often do their thing for a specific period of time, get degraded by the elements over time, fall, and are replaced. How do you tell whether the dropping of leaves is just normal or signs of a severe problem?

Look at the type of leaves dropping. If the older leaves on the lower or inside parts of a tree are dropping, that is normal. The tree is in serious trouble if the newest leaves at the tips of tree branches are dropping.

4. Too little or too much water

Too little or too much water can lead to late summer leaf loss. In drought-like conditions, some trees will shed leaves to combat drought stress. Likewise, over-watered leaves can turn yellow and fall off. Excess water can suffocate the roots of the tree that cause stress in the canopy. Possibly, this is what was causing the oak tree of our reader in Texas to drop its leaves in summer.

 

Misconceptions about Tree Topping

If you’ve noticed that the trees around your house are beginning to outgrow their space, you need to contact a specialized arborist. Nonetheless, when you do, it is best also to know the method that can be taken to care for the issue.

Knoxville Tree Topping Knowledge-2-2The topping of trees is an approach that is hazardous to the well being of a tree as well as to the potential safety of your home. Topping involves removing more than 50 percent of the leaves of a tree. This gives the appearance of a tree reduced in size and for that reason provides a solution. In truth, it just causes extra difficulties.

When those leaves of a tree are taken out so rapidly, it stunts the feeding process of a tree. Leaves supply food and nutrients for a tree and without them, it can temporarily starve. So that you can survive, a tree will grow many shoots below every cut that was made so that you can produce new leaves, and new food, as quick as possible. A tree will likely be critically weakened and stressed by this process and could even die if it doesn’t have the correct quantity of energy stored.

A stressed tree also increases its susceptibility to attacks from pests and illnesses. Open cuts from pruning leave a tree exposed, and if it is already weakened, it may well not have the energy to fend off attacks.

Also, topping increases the likelihood of decay. Mainly because of where the cut is made – generally along a horizontal branches, which generates stubs – the tissues of wood are exposed. Usually, a tree would have the ability to protect itself against these wounds, but given the different extrem injuries made by topping, the tissues decay. This makes a tree weaker and far more vulnerable to being toppled during thunder storms or high winds, giving danger to your home.

The preferred spot of a cut to your tree should extend the collar of the branch collar at the branch’s point of attachment, a place where a tree is biologically prepared to close the wound. Canopy raising, which opens up space underneath the canopy of a tree, and canopy thinning, which removes harmful limbs first and then other people to enable air and light to pass through, are two secure alternatives when trimming your tree. You should never remove much more than 25 percent of a tree’s leaves in a given year.

Tree Topping: A Unsafe Tactic.

Tree topping is not the answer whenever you have concerns over the size of your trees. When compared to other alternatives, it is dangerous and unnecessary.